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Surreptitious

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9 thoughts on “ Surreptitious

  1. The Crossword Solver found 92 answers to the surreptitious crossword clue. The Crossword Solver finds answers to American-style crosswords, British-style crosswords, general knowledge crosswords and cryptic crossword puzzles. Enter the answer length or the answer pattern to get better results. Click the answer to find similar crossword clues.
  2. When something is obtained/done/made, by stealth/secrets. "I've never been so surreptitious" (Panic!At The Disco-Theres a good reason these tables are numbered honey,You just havn't thought of it yet).
  3. Surreptitious is a nice novella about love and revenge. It's that story that gives you hope for true love, but also leaves you with a sadness. Roman is a man with deep desires for Martin, but when they are reciprocated, Roman doesn't know how to act/5(31).
  4. Surreptitious definition is - done, made, or acquired by stealth: clandestine. How to use surreptitious in a sentence. Synonym Discussion of surreptitious.
  5. Synonyms for surreptitious in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for surreptitious. 28 synonyms for surreptitious: secret, clandestine, furtive, sneaking, veiled, covert, sly.
  6. Late Middle English (in the sense ‘obtained by suppression of the truth’): from Latin surreptitius (from the verb surripere, from sub- ‘secretly’ + rapere ‘seize’) + -ous.
  7. sur·rep·ti·tious (sûr′əp-tĭsh′əs) adj. Obtained, done, or made by clandestine or stealthy means. See Synonyms at secret. [Middle English, from Latin surreptīcius, from surreptus, past participle of surripere, to take away secretly: sub-, secretly; see sub- + rapere, to seize; see rep- in Indo-European roots.] sur′rep·ti′tious·ly adv.
  8. For several days after my first book was published, I carried it about in my pocket and took surreptitious peeps at it to make sure the ink had not faded. — James M. Barrie; Germany’s Supreme Court ruled last year that evidence gained from surreptitious searches of a suspect’s computers were inadmissible in the absence of surveillance laws regulating police hacking activity.
  9. Jun 04,  · Borrowed from Latin surrēptīcius (“furtive, clandestine”), from surrēpō (“to creep along”).

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